Yes, No (Arbitrary Bible)

Yes, No (Arbitrary Bible), Altered books, rice paper, acrylic paint, 12.7 x 17.8 x 7.6 cm (5 x 7 x 3 in), 2009
Yes, No (Arbitrary Bible), Altered books, rice paper, acrylic paint, 12.7 x 17.8 x 7.6 cm (5 x 7 x 3 in), 2009
Yes, No (Arbitrary Bible), Altered books, rice paper, acrylic paint, 12.7 x 17.8 x 7.6 cm (5 x 7 x 3 in), 2009
Yes, No (Arbitrary Bible), Altered books, rice paper, acrylic paint, 12.7 x 17.8 x 7.6 cm (5 x 7 x 3 in), 2009

About Yes, No (Arbitrary Bible)

In response to an idea in Michael Euyung Oh’s work I chose the Bible to apply an arbitrary decision making process. For example, in Oh’s 200 Sex Offenders (2000) he used his own standard of attraction to rate the photos. His work employs a ranking system that is meaningless and absurd, asking the viewer to question ranking systems.

While I have used my own personal preferences for choosing the text that remains legible in the YES volume as well as the NO volume, I have intended to expose in the physical what a reader does in their own mind when approaching any text, or even object. Promoting those parts that appeal, feeling elitist about those we dislike, and ignoring the rest.

Bogus

Bogus, paper on paper, 22 x 30 inches
Bogus, paper on paper, 22 x 30 inches
Detail
Detail

About Bogus

Many race theorists include in their discussions a quote from Melville’s Moby Dick, “a colorless, all-color of atheism from which we shrink”. Bogus consists of each occurrence of the word “white”, or variations of it, carefully cut from a copy of Moby Dick, glued onto a sheet of white paper.

Pontiac

Pontiac Laurentian, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 48 or something like that.
Pontiac Laurentian, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 48 or something like that.
Pontiac Laurentian, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 48 or something like that.
Pontiac Laurentian, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 48 or something like that.

Humn 311

I am currently taking a 6 week, 3 credit Humanities course about the physical and the psychical. Although the course pack is ginormous, the readings so far have been very intriguing. I think I am really going to enjoy the learning.

However, I do have a personal beef. There is not enough time in the class to really digest points or opinions that are brought up during the class time. I have decided that I am going to post my own responses here…after they have been rolling around in my head, keeping me awake half the night.

Bell and Ah Kee

The third year is over, the spring has taken hold and I am gearing up for another class to begin next Monday. Getting a jump on some fourth year credits. I have completed some scholarship applications and have my second born home from university (a visual arts and design university no less) for the summer.

Basically I have been re-organizing my studio space (a spare bedroom) and purging much of the past three years worth of exercises. Some of it has even been selected to become under-paintings for new works. I have also been reading a few books, playing games on Facebook, and watching TV.

It just so happened that last night I tuned into an art program featuring Vernon Ah Kee and Richard Bell.  Again non-white males. (I am beginning to have issues with the label white, black etc., but that is for another conversation.) Ah Kee and Bell are Australian Aboriginals and have found their voices by exploring issues through text based works. What is so interesting to me is how pointed some of the work is. I am wondering if I am up for creating work with the same type of strong messaging.

More on Ah Kee:
http://www.daao.org.au/main/read/6995

More on Bell:
http://www.kooriweb.org/bell/man.html